JAPANESE KNOTWEED EXTRACT

Polygonum cuspidatum

Japanese Knotweed is a dense growing shrub native to Eastern Asia, and introduced into North America in the late 1800s.

Benefits:

Stimulate cell repair
Support healthy aging
Protect against oxidative damage
Promote longevity

How it works:

The plant extract is popular in both historical and modern use for its high natural abundance of trans-resveratrol, a natural phenol well studied for its support of cardiovascular health, skin health, longevity, and healthy aging. Studies have shown that resveratrol targets active sites in epidermal cells and can upregulate compounds within the body (i.e. glutathione peroxidase) that protect against oxidative related skin damage during aging.

Safe and Effective Dosage:

Clinical studies support safe and effective dosages of between 1 to 1000 mg, with most beneficial dosage at 20 mg.

Our dosage:

20 mg. 

NON-GMO

VEGAN

GLUTEN FREE

RESEARCH &
CLINICAL STUDIES

"Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging"

ABSTRACT:

Skin has been reported to reflect the general inner-health status and aging.

Nutrition and its reflection on skin has always been an interesting topic for scientists and physicians throughout the centuries worldwide.

Vitamins, carotenoids, tocopherols, flavonoids and a variety of plant extracts have been reported to possess potent anti-oxidant properties and have been widely used in the skin care industry either as topically applied agents or oral supplements in an attempt to prolong youthful skin appearance.

This review will provide an overview of the current literature “linking” nutrition with skin aging.

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"Protective action of resveratrol in human skin: possible involvement of specific receptor binding sites"

ABSTRACT:

Background: Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol with purported protecting action on various disorders associated with aging. It has been suggested that resveratrol could exert its protective action by acting on specific plasma membrane polyphenol binding sites (Han Y.S., et al. (2006) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:238-245). The purpose of this study was to investigate, in human skin, the possible existence of specific binding sites that mediate the protective action of resveratrol.

Methods and findings: Using human skin tissue, we report here the presence of specific [(3)H]-resveratrol binding sites (K(D) = 180 nM) that are mainly located in the epidermis. Exposure of HaCaT cells to the nitric oxide free radical donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 0.3-3 mM) resulted in cell death which was reduced by resveratrol (EC(50) = 14.7 µM), and to a much lesser extent by the resveratrol analogue piceatannol (EC(50) = 95 µM) and epigallocatechin gallate (EC(50) = 200 µM), a green-tea derived polyphenol. The protective action of resveratrol likely relates to its anti-apoptotic effect since at the same range of concentration it was able to reduce both the number of apoptotic cells as well as mitochondrial apoptotic events triggered by SNP.

Conclusion: Taken together, these findings suggest that resveratrol, by acting on specific polyphenol binding sites in epidermis, may be useful to prevent skin disorders associated with aging.

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